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Alameda County Supervisor Wilma Chan dies after being hit by car while walking dog

"North star," "trailblazer," and "one of our strongest leaders" are some of the terms Bay Area elected officials used to describe Alameda County Supervisor Wilma Chan, who died after being struck by a car Wednesday morning in Alameda.
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Alameda County Supervisor Wilma Chan died Nov. 3 after being hit by a car while on a morning walk with her dog.

"North star," "trailblazer," and "one of our strongest leaders" are some of the terms Bay Area elected officials used to describe Alameda County Supervisor Wilma Chan, who died after being struck by a car Wednesday morning in Alameda.

Police responded just after 8 a.m. to Shoreline Drive and Grand Street after someone reported the collision. Chan had been walking her dog Maggie when the collision occurred.

She suffered a head injury and was taken to Highland Hospital where she died at 2:30 p.m., her office said in a statement.

"This is such a devastating loss," state Sen. Nancy Skinner (D-Oakland), said in a statement.

"Wilma Chan was an absolute trailblazer and a decades-long champion for those in need," Skinner said. "She was not only the first Asian American elected to the Alameda County Board of Supervisors, but she was also the first woman and the first Asian American to serve as State Assembly Majority Leader."

"She was passionate about expanding health care and protecting Californians, especially families of color, from environmental toxins," Skinner said. "She was also instrumental in saving San Leandro Hospital, an essential East Bay institution, from closure."

"Supervisor Chan was a north star for so many important issues that served the vulnerable in our community," Alameda County District Attorney Nancy O'Malley said in a statement. "She was a champion, for example, of All In Alameda County," which helps to alleviate poverty.

O'Malley said Chan's commitment to her community and to the county will be missed.

Berkeley City Councilman Rigel Robinson said on social media, "Traffic violence took one of our strongest leaders today. May her memory drive us to fight ever harder for a healthier, safer future."

Chan advocated on behalf of children, families, and seniors and advocated for affordable housing and health care for the uninsured, her office said. She represented District 3, which includes Alameda, San Leandro, San Lorenzo, Hayward Acres and parts of Oakland.

Police said the driver of the vehicle stayed at the scene and cooperated with the investigation. No other details were being released by police or the city.

Surviving Chan are two children and two grandchildren. They wish to thank the first responders and medical staff who cared for their mother and grandmother. The family is requesting privacy at this time.